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MLA 8th Edition Style Guide - Websites & Web Pages

Websites

If your research source is the entire website and not just one page within it, cite the website as a whole. If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice.

Examples:

Cosumnes River College Website. Los Rios Community College District, www.crc.losrios.edu. Accessed 27 July 2016.


The Purdue OWL Family of Sites. The Writing Lab/OWL at Purdue/Purdue U, 2008, owl.english.purdue.edu/owl. Accessed 23 June 2016.

Webpage

If your research source is one page on a much larger website, your citation should begin with the author (if listed) or the title of the webpage. If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice.

Examples:

"Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease." Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 4 Feb. 2016, www.cdc.gov/hand-foot-mouth/. Accessed 25 Aug. 2016.


Lundman, Susan. "How to Make Vegetarian Chili." eHow, www.ehow.com/how_10727_make-vegetarian-chili.html. Accessed 6 July 2016.

Newspaper Article on Website

If the city of publication is not included in the newspaper's name, add it in square brackets after the name. This is not necessary for nationally published newspapers (e.g. The Wall Street Journal). If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice.

Examples:

Siders, David. “Jerry Brown Compares Fighting Climate Change to Building Noah’s Ark.” Sacramento Bee, 19 Sept. 2016, www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article102749097.html. Accessed 19 Sept. 2016.


Perlroth, Nicole. “Yahoo Says Hackers Stole Data on 500 Million Users in 2014." The New York Times, 22 Sept. 2016, nyti.ms/2crtUMA. Accessed 22 Sept. 2016.

Magazine Article on a Website

If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice.

Examples:

Tribble, Ivan. “Bloggers Need Not Apply.” The Chronicle of Higher Education, 8 July 2005, chronicle.com/article/Bloggers-Need-Not-Apply/45022. Accessed 5 May 2016.


Deresiewcz, William. “The Death of the Artist - and the Birth of the Creative Entrepreneur.” The Atlantic, 28 Dec. 2014, www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/01/the-death-of-the-artist-and-the-birth-of-the-creative-entrepreneur/383497/. Accessed 15 June 2016.

Journal Article from a Website

Some publishers assign a digital object identifier (DOI) to online publications. Because URLs are sometimes not stable, it’s desirable to use the DOI if it is available.

Examples:

Mahmood, Sajid, et al. "Effectiveness of School-Based Intervention Programs in Reducing Prevalence of Overweight." Indian Journal Of Community Medicine, vol. 39, no. 2, Apr-Jun 2014, pp. 87-93. Pub Med Central, doi:10.4103/0970-0218.132724. Accessed 3 July 2016.


MacKean, Peter Reagh, et al. "Psychosocial Diagnoses Occurring after Patients Present with Fatigue.” Canadian Family Physician, vol. 62, no. 8, Aug 2016, pp. e465–e472. National Center for Biotechnology, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4982745/. Accessed 5 Sept. 2016

Blog

If the blog is part of a larger network of blogs, include that network as the publisher element of the citation (example one below). If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice.

Examples:

Clancy, Kate. “Defensive Scholarly Writing and Science Communication.” Context and Variation, Scientific American Blogs, 24 Apr. 2013, blogs.scientificamerican.com/context-and-variation/defensive-scholarly-writing-and-science-communication/. Accessed 14 Sept. 2016.


Hollmichel, Stefanie. “The Reading Brain: Differences between Digital and Print.” So Many Books, 25 Apr. 2013, somanybooksblog.com/2013/04/25/the-reading-brain-differences-between-digital-and-print/. Accessed 15 May. 2013.

Video on a Website

If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice. Other video examples can be found on the TV, Film & Video page.

Examples:

"Why Citation is Important." Writen by Joshua Vossler, Vimeo, uploaded by Kimbel Library, 2010, vimeo.com/13547869. Accessed 26 Aug. 2016.


“The Speech that Made Obama President.” YouTube, uploaded by THNKR, 30 Aug. 2012, www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFPwDe22CoY. Accessed 4 Aug. 2016

Image on a Website (including photography, artwork, or sculpture)

If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice.

Examples:

Smith, Susan. Sunflower Field. 21 July 2016, Flickr, flic.kr/p/KiWbWS. Accessed 10 Aug. 2016.


Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de. The Family of Charles IV. 1800, Madrid. Museo Nacional del Prado, www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/art-work/the-family-of-carlos-iv/f47898fc-aa1c-48f6-a779-71759e417e74. Accessed 22 May 2016.


Klee, Paul. Twittering Machine. 1922. Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Artchive, www.artchive.com/artchive/K/klee/twittering_machine.jpg.html. Accessed 15 May 2016.

Comment on a Webpage

The username is listed as the author. The phrase, "Comment on," comes before the title. If there is a timestamp for the comment, include it after the date. If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice.

Examples:

McLeoad, Ginny. Comment on "To Fact Check or Not: Campaigns Disagree on the Role of Debate Moderator." ABC News, 26 Sept. 2016, 1:47 p.m., abcnews.go.com/Politics/fact-check-campaigns-disagree-role-debate-moderator/story?id=42363412. Accessed 26 Sept. 2016.


Jeane. Comment on "The Reading Brain: Differences between Digital and Print." So Many Books, 25 Apr. 2013, 10:30 p.m., somanybooksblog.com/2013/04/25/the-reading-brain-differences-between-digital-and-print/#comment-83030. Accessed 14 May 2014.

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