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MLA 8th Edition Style Guide - Entries & Chapters

Entry in a Print Encyclopedia

When the entry has an associated author, start the citation with the author's name - last name first. If no author is listed, start with the name of the entry.

Examples:

Carroll, Michael P. “Myth.” Encyclopedia of Cultural Anthropology, edited by David Levinson and Melvin Ember, vol. 3, Henry Holt and Company, 1996, pp. 827-831.


"Balfour Declaration." The New Encyclopedia of Islam, edited by Cyril Glassé, 4th ed., Rowman & Littlefield, 2013, pp. 82-86.

Entry in an eBook Encyclopedia

When the entry has an associated author, start the citation with the author's name - last name first. If no author is listed, start with the name of the entry.

Examples:

Ward, Susan. "A-Line Dress." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion, edited by Valerie Steele, vol. 1, Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005, pp. 35-36. Gale Virtual Reference Library, 0-go.galegroup.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=cclc_sac&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CCX3427500025&asid=5bb1f6565536ff859f42ee84176aa8d2. Accessed 20 Sept. 2016.


"Alice Paul: American Suffragist." Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009. britannica.com/biography/Alice-Paul. Accessed 15 Aug. 2016.

Essay, Story, or Play in a Collection

When a work that is normally independent (such as a novel or play) appears in a collection, the work’s title remains in italics.

Examples:

Euripides. The Trojan Women. Ten Plays, translated by Paul Roche, New American Library, 1998, pp. 457-512.


Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Men. Short Novels of John Steinbeck. Penguin Classics, 2009, pp. 225-96.

Chapter or Essay in an Edited Book

If there is an author listed for the chapter, begin the citation with the author’s name, inverted with last name first. If no author is listed, begin with the title of the article or section.

Examples:

"Facts About Factory Farming." Factory Farming, edited by Lauri S. Scherer, Greenhaven Press, 2015, pp. 106-109. Gale Virtual Reference Library, 0-go.galegroup.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=cclc_sac&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CCX3619500025&asid=6f48781c35e03c538f3bea96ae2edcff. Accessed 20 Sept. 2016.


London, Jack. "The Enemy of All the World." The Complete Short Stories of Jack London, edited by Earle Labor, et al., vol. 2, Stanford UP, 1993, pp. 1247-50.

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