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MLA 8th Edition Style Guide - Artwork & Maps

Artwork in a Book

When the focus of your research is the artwork itself and not the book in which the artwork is pictured, start the citation with the artist’s name and the name of the piece.

Examples:

Rodin, Auguste. The Thinker. 1880, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Rodin’s Art: The Rodin Collection of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University, by Albert E. Elsen, Oxford UP, 2003, p. 176.


Gris, Juan. Fantômas, 1915, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Cubism, by Guillaume Apollinaire, et al., Parkstone International, 2010. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), 0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=436186&site=ehost-live&scope=site. Accessed 29 Sept. 2016.

Artwork in a Database

Examples:

Douglas, Aaron. Aspirations.1936, Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Oxford Art Online, 0-www.oxfordartonline.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/subscriber/article/img/grove/art/F024223. Accessed 22 May 2016.


O'Keefe, Georgia. Sunflower, New Mexico, I. 1935, The Cleveland Museum of Art, Artstor, 0-library.artstor.org.lasiii.losrios.edu/library/secure/ViewImages?id=8D1Efjk2NjsgQi85cDV%2BQXAk. Accessed 14 Sept. 2016.

Artwork on a Website

If the website name is essentially the same as the publisher, there is no need to list it twice.

Examples:

Smith, Susan. Sunflower Field. 21 July 2016, Flickr, flic.kr/p/KiWbWS. Accessed 10 Aug. 2016.


Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de. The Family of Charles IV. 1800, Madrid. Museo Nacional del Prado, www.museodelprado.es/en/the-collection/art-work/the-family-of-carlos-iv/f47898fc-aa1c-48f6-a779-71759e417e74. Accessed 22 May 2016.


Klee, Paul. Twittering Machine. 1922. Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Artchive, www.artchive.com/artchive/K/klee/twittering_machine.jpg.html. Accessed 15 May 2016.

Artwork Experienced In-Person

When you have physically experienced a piece of artwork in a museum, gallery, or other space, the citation should include the name of the space and the city, unless the name of the city is part of the place name. The citation begins with the original artist’s name.

Examples:

Rodin, Auguste. The Thinker. 1880, National Gallery of Art, Washington.


Bearden, Romare. The Train. 1975, Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Untitled Artwork

If the artwork doesn’t have a formal title, give a generic description of the object with no italics or quotation marks.

Examples:

Wright, Frank Lloyd. Leaded glass skylight. 1908, Meyer May House, Grand Rapids.


Mackintosh, Charles Rennie. Chair of stained oak. 1897-1900, Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Map

If there is no clear author or the author and publisher are the same, start with the title of the map. If the scale is listed, treat it as the "Version" element. If the source is an unexpected type of work like a map, you may identify the type with a descriptive term at the end of the citation. The following examples use this optional element.

Examples:

"Alameda Well, CA." US Geological Survey, Scale 1:24 000, 1994. Map.


"Dunnigan, CA." US Geological Survey, Scale 1:24 000, 1973. Map.

Map in a Book

If there is no clear author or the author and publisher are the same, start with the title of the map. If the source is an unexpected type of work like a map, you may identify the type with a descriptive term at the end of the citation. The following examples use this optional element.

Examples:

Magocsi, Paul Robert. "Population Movements, 1944-1948." Historical Atlas of Central Europe, Revised and Expanded ed., U of Washington P, 2002, p. 191. Map.


"Northwestern South America." Atlas of the World, 10th ed., National Geographic Society, 2015, p. 53. Map.


McCoy, Roger M. "Expeditions in the Arctic Islands." On the Edge: Mapping North America's Coasts, Oxford UP, 2012, p. 175. Map. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?authtype=ip,guest&custid=sacram&groupid=main&profile=eds&direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=672474&site=eds-live&scope=site. Accessed 14 June 2016.

Map on a Website

If there is no clear author or the author and publisher are the same, start with the title of the map. If the scale is listed, treat it as the "Version" element. If the source is an unexpected type of work like a map, you may identify the type with a descriptive term at the end of the citation. The following examples use this optional element.

Examples:

USGS US Topo 7.5-minute map for Bruceville, CA 2015. National Geospatial Technical Operations Center, 24 Mar. 2015, Map. US Geological Survey, prd-tnm.s3.amazonaws.com/StagedProducts/Maps/USTopo/1/22249/7534222.pdf. Accessed 31 July 2015.


California State Parks System Map. California State Parks, 2016, Map. California Department of Parks and Recreation, www.parks.ca.gov/pages/862/files/planning%20milestones%20map%20july%201-2015%20web%20page.pdf. Accessed 28 Sept. 2016.

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